MEG MEDINA

www.megmedina.com
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo by Sonya Sones

Meg Medina is a Newbery award-winning and New York Times best-selling author who writes picture books, as well as middle grade and young adult fiction. Her works have been called "heartbreaking," "lyrical" and "must haves for every collection." Her titles include:

  • Evelyn del Rey is Moving Away, Coming in September, 2020
  • Merci Suárez Changes Gears,  2019 John Newbery Medal winner, and 2019 Charlotte Huck Honor Book;
  • Burn Baby Burn, long-listed for the 2016 National Book Award, short-listed for the Kirkus Prize, and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize;
  • Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass, winner of the 2014 Pura Belpré Author Award;
  • The Girl Who Could Silence the Wind, a 2012 Bank Street College Best Children’s Book of the Year;
  • Mango, Abuela, and Me, a 2016 Pura Belpré Author Honor Book; and
  • Tía Isa Wants a Car, winner of the 2012 Ezra Jack Keats New Writers Award.

When she’s not writing, Meg works on community projects that support girls, Latino youth, and/or literacy. She serves on the National Board of Advisors for the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and is a faculty member of Hamline University’s Masters of Fine Arts in Children’s Literature. She lives with her family in Richmond, Virginia.

 

Books

Evelyn Del Rey is Moving AwayEvelyn del Rey is Moving Away  (Candlewick Press, September 2020)

Coming soon! Evelyn Del Rey is Daniela's best friend. They do everything together and even live in twin apartments across the street from each other: Daniela with her mami and hamster, and Evelyn with her mami, papi, and cat. But not after today--not after Evelyn moves away. Until then, the girls play amid the moving boxes until it's time to say goodbye, making promises to keep in touch, because they know that their friendship will always be special. The tenderness of Meg Medina's beautifully written story about friendship and change is balanced by Sonia Sánchez's colorful and vibrant depictions of the girls' urban neighborhood.

Merci Suarez Changes GearsMerci Suárez Changes Gears (Candlewick Press, 2018)

Merci Suárez knew that sixth grade would be different, but she had no idea just how different. For starters, she’s not exactly like the other kids at Seaward Pines because she and her older brother, Roli, are scholarship students. At home, Merci’s most trusted ally, Lolo, has been acting strangely and no one in her family will tell her anything about what’s going on with her grandfather. In a coming of age story that features family, friends, frenemies – and ripped off eyebrows – we look at the confusion and constant change that define middle school and the steadfast connection that defines family.

Mango Abuela and Mango, Abuela and Me (Candlewick Press, 2015; Spanish language edition available: Mango, Abuela y Yo

Mia doesn’t speak Spanish. Abuela doesn’t speak English. How can they get to know each other if they can’t communicate? It’s a spunky parrot named Mango to the rescue.

Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your AssYaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass (Candlewick Press, 2013; Spanish language edition available: Yaqui Delgado Quiere Darte Una Paliza)

Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass. That’s what some girl tells Piddy Sanchez one morning. Piddy doesn’t even know who Yaqui Delgado is, much less what she’s done to get her mad. But Yaqui isn’t kidding around. Paddy tries to focus on finding out more about the father she’s never met and balancing honors courses with her job at the neighborhood hair salon, but avoiding Yaqui and her gang starts to take over Piddy’s life. She’s forced to decide exactly who she is versus who others are trying to make her become -- and ultimately discovers a rhythm that is all her own.

Burn Baby BurnBurn Baby Burn (Candlewick Press, 2016)

Nora Lopez is seventeen during the infamous New York summer of 1977, when the city is besieged by arson, a massive blackout, and a serial killer named Son of Sam who shoots young women on the streets. Nora’s family life isn’t going so well either: her bullying brother, Hector, is growing more threatening by the day, her mother is helpless and falling behind on the rent, and her father calls only on holidays. All Nora wants is to turn eighteen and be on her own. And while there is a cute new guy who started working with her at the deli, is dating even worth the risk when the killer likes picking off couples who stay out too late? Award-winning author Meg Medina transports us to a time when New York seemed balanced on a knife-edge, with tempers and temperatures running high, to share the story of a young woman who discovers that the greatest dangers are often closer than we like to admit — and the hardest to accept.

The Girl Who Could Silence the WindThe Girl Who Could Silence the Wind (Candlewick Press, 2012)

Sixteen-year-old Sonia Ocampo was born on the night of the worst storm Tres Montes had ever seen. And when the winds mercifully stopped, an unshakable belief in the girl’s protective powers began. All her life, Sonia has been asked to pray for sick mothers or missing sons, as worried parents and friends press silver milagros in her hands. Sonia knows she has no special powers, but how can she disappoint those who look to her for solace? Still, her conscience is heavy, so when she gets a chance to travel to the city and work in the home of a wealthy woman, she seizes it. At first, Sonia feels freedom in being treated like all the other girls. But when news arrives that her beloved brother has disappeared while looking for work, she learns to her sorrow that she can never truly leave the past or her family behind. With deeply realized characters, a keen sense of place, a hint of magical realism, and a flush of young romance, Meg Medina tells the tale of a strong-willed, warmhearted girl who dares to face life’s harsh truths as she finds her real power.

Tia Isa Wants a CarTia Isa Wants a Car (Candlewick Press, 2011; Spanish language edition available: Tía Isa Quiere Un Carro)

While Tía Isa wants to save money for a car that will take the whole family to the beach, her niece does odd jobs for neighbors. But it’s hard to save enough when half the money is set aside to someday bring family members who live far away to join them. Meg Medina’s simple, genuine story about keeping in mind those who are far away is written in lovely, lyrical prose and brought to life through Claudio Muñoz’s charming characters.


Mango Abuela and Me Meg Medina and Mango Abuela and Me posterMango Abuela and Me (Candlewick Press, 2015), winner of the Pura Belpré Honor medal
(Spanish language edition available: Mango, Abuela y Yo)

Synopsis: Mia’s abuela has left her sunny house with parrots and palm trees to live with Mia and her parents in the city. The night she arrives, Mia tries to share her favorite book with Abuela before they go to sleep and discovers that Abuela can’t read the words inside. So while they cook, Mia helps Abuela learn English (“Dough. Masa”), and Mia learns some Spanish too, but it’s still hard for Abuela to learn the words she needs to tell Mia all her stories. Then Mia sees a parrot in the pet-shop window and has the perfecto idea for how to help them all communicate a little better. An endearing tale from an award-winning duo that speaks loud and clear about learning new things and the love that bonds family members

   

 

Contacts:

School visits: https://theauthorvillage.com/presenters/meg-medina/. For the foreseeable future, all visits will be virtual. Skype visits and festivals/conferences supported by the publisher: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Other: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Newsletter

Calendar

Author Visits

Book Trailers